10 Tips to Sell More Products: Best Practices for Facebook Ad images

by | Dec 30, 2021 | Facebook, Product Photography, Tips | 0 comments

Facebook is the third most-visited website and the second most downloaded app.  with over 2.74 billion active monthly users — it’s an opportunity for marketing you don’t want to miss out on.  but Facebook is also very saturated with ads.

We’re covering the best practices for successful Facebook ad images so you can maximize conversion through Facebook ads without being lost in the noise of the largest social media platform.

Facebook Ads: The Specs

Facebook Feed Ad Images

Feed ads refer to when your advertisement shows up in the feed of users — sandwiched between a status update from their aunt and a cute photo of their neighbor’s baby.  These types of ads are seen very frequently but are easy to scroll past.  This means a catchy image and clear ad copy are paramount.

✨ Details

  • file type: JPG / PNG
  • ratio: 1.91:1 to 1:1
  • resolution: 1080 x 1080 pixels
  • file size: 30MB
  • text: 125 characters

Facebook right column ad images

Right column ads are a desktop only option. they work well for a call-to-action (ie: “shop the sale now!”) for actions that you’d like users to do on their desktops.

✨ Details

  • file type: JPG / PNG
  • ratio: 1:1
  • resolution: 1080 x 1080 pixels
  • file size: 30MB
  • text: 40 characters

Facebook instant article images

Instant articles are like quick digestible articles placed in the Facebook feed. Certain publishers are allowed to include ads in their articles — and this is where your article would show up. The idea is that your ad would be placed in a spot where readers are already engaged rather than just as they’re scrolling through the feed. This method is optimized for mobile users.

✨ Details

  • file type: JPG / PNG
  • ratio: 1.91:1 to 1:1
  • resolution: 1080 x 1080 pixels
  • file size: 30MB
  • text: 125 characters

Facebook marketplace ad images

Marketplace is Facebook’s center for shopping — local or worldwide. That means users are already in the mood to shop! so utilizing marketplace ads can work in your favor as potential customers are already on the hunt for something.

✨ Details

  • file type: JPG / PNG
  • ratio: 1:1
  • resolution: 1080 x 1080 pixels
  • file size: 30MB
  • text: 125 characters

Facebook stories images for ads

Stories are an immersive and fun way to advertise. users tend to be very engaged with stories as they’re typically more video-based. Facebook allows you to add animations or emojis to stories as well — if that’s your jam! They’re also great for call-to-action as stories expire and create a sense of urgency for viewers.

✨ Details

  • file type: JPG / PNG
  • ratio: 9:16
  • resolution: 1080 x 1080 pixels
  • file size: 30MB
  • text: 125 characters

10 Best Practices For Facebook Ads

1. keep it high resolution!

Your first priority — before ever posting an ad — is prioritizing high-quality images. Use high-resolution images to ensure they’re not blurry. Grainy. Or hard to read. Potential customers will not trust your product if your ad is of low quality. Pay special attention to the image sizes and resolution recommendations for any ad you choose to post!

2. let the images speak for you

Facebook’s algorithms don’t like too much text in an ad — and that’s because their users don’t either so they’re not as lucrative. Don’t exceed the suggested character limits for an ad type. It’s not an arbitrary suggestion: those character limits are what looks best and get the most attention from users. However — less text means your images need to really communicate your brand message and personality well! There are special considerations for Facebook ads. The images you use on your own website are viewed by those who are already familiar with your brand — but Facebook ads may be seen by someone who’s never heard of you or your product! Your images need to make an introduction. Explanation. And selling point all in one!

3. utilize relatable models

There’s a time and a place for quirky editorial marketing images. But on Facebook — your ads will be viewed along with the documented lives of everyday people — loved ones. Coworkers. Old high school friends. This means if you get too experimental with your product photos they may feel out of place and even off-putting to Facebook users. For this particular platform: it’s recommended that you use relatable lifestyle images that show models using your product — as if a friend was making a post recommending the product to their social media circle.

4. keep it light and happy!

To build on the previous point: your models should also be happy and enjoying your product. Save the moody broody edgy model shots for other social media platforms — Facebook is the place for playful and engaging models. Use children and pets as models for an extra boost of good vibes!

5. use a different color scheme

If you close your eyes and picture Facebook — you probably see that classic blue and white color scheme that it’s had for 18 years. It’s classic. Unoffensive to the eye. Simple. But your ad needs to really pop off the page. That means you’ll want to be careful to use colors that clearly contrast with that blue and white. Consider using something other than image-on-white (as you would for a platform like Shopify).

6. include the same logo every time

Incorporating a logo in your product photos — especially for a busy social media website like Facebook — will help build brand recognition. Maybe a user won’t stop for your ad the first or second time they see it. But if you use the same logo each time and they see it a third time: it could pique their curiosity. If you don’t have a uniform logo: they may not be aware that they’re seeing it a third time.

7. keep it short

Images with 20% or less text perform best on Facebook. Keep your description short (try using a call-to-action or a signature brand motto) and — if you choose to include text within the image itself — it should avoid being busy and distracting.

8. people love to see pets!

Similar to the above point about utilizing models — pet models can be even more effective. You absolutely don’t have to have a pet-related product to utilize a pet model. (pssst: unhinged has the most adorable pet models). A cute animal is one of the best ways to stop the scroll and catch a user’s attention.

9. know your target audiences

The demographics of Facebook users are complicated and it is difficult to know what content each demographic tends to spend more attention on. You know your brand better than anyone! If you think your product will sell best to a certain gender – age group – profession – etc. Design your ad to cater to that specific group. Create multiple different ads for different targets if necessary! Trying to cast a wide net with one very general ad may miss the mark.

10. it’s a different ballgame!

At first glance, it may seem tedious to have separate and varied marketing images for each different social media platform. However this is the best way to maximize your engagement on TikTok where short videos can be humorous with other people’s audio or original music added in at times; Instagram users love seeing something they’re missing out on so if you want them motivated by an idea of what kind of product will inspire their life then tailored photos might work better than thought-provoking images like those found elsewhere online! Lastly: The best way to get your photos noticed on Facebook is by making them relatable and casual. Make it possible for users of each site, from Instagram or Twitter all the way down to Snapchat can picture themselves using or owning what you’re promoting in every photo that will be shared with this audience! The key here – especially if we want as many people seeing our products at home during their everyday lives rather than just when they’re shopping online – isn’t think about one single perfect image but instead create a shot list for each location your photos will be posted.
About Jason
[dipl_blog_slider _builder_version=”4.20.4″ _module_preset=”default” hover_enabled=”0″ sticky_enabled=”0″ include_categories=”81″ post_per_slide=”2″ post_per_slide_last_edited=”on|tablet” post_per_slide_phone=”1″ show_arrow=”off” show_control_dot=”off” post_per_slide_tablet=”1″ excerpt_length=”200″ show_date=”off” show_categories=”off” show_comments=”off” disabled_on=”on|on|on” disabled=”on”][/dipl_blog_slider]